Navigation

About Chris

Early days of fishing and wakeboarding boats. These days a little more relaxing and sailing time, mostly on catamarans. Still too poor be a yacht man.

Articles by Chris

Marine Pollution

Marine Pollution – Additional Information Definitions: Plastic includes, but is not limited to; plastic bags, styrofoam cups and lids, six pack holders, stirrers, straws, milk jugs, egg cartons, synthetic nets, ropes, lines and bio or photo-degradable plastics. Garbage means paper, rags, glass, metal, crockery (generated in living spaces aboard the vessel — what we normally call trash),…

Read More

Boating Courses Online

Basic Boating Safety Certification Course – Approved by NASBLA, recognized by the U.S. Coast Guard. Successful completion of this course entitles most boat owners to a discount on marine insurance premiums. Take this course on your own schedule and at your own pace. Help is available via email. Coastal Navigation – basic navigation course is a combination…

Read More

Nautical Know How Basic Boating Safety Certification Final Exam

To take the final exam online:  This is the quickest way to receive your documents. You will also know right away whether you have passed or failed. If you cannot take the final exam online, you can print and mail this exam. This option is much slower than taking the final exam online . INSTRUCTIONS : After you have…

Read More

Kansas Basic Boating Safety Course

This chapter contains information on Kansas Boating Regulations that are in addition to the Federal Requirements covered in the Basic Boating Course. If you have not reviewed the course material, please do so now. All Federal Requirements in the basic boating course apply to Kansas; this section lists Kansas Boating Requirements that are above and beyond Federal Requirements. o receive your…

Read More

Hull Designs And Uses

Boat designs encompass a vast range depending on the specific use for which the boat is planned. Boats are basically designed in two categories: displacement and planing. Displacement vessels are designed to move through the water with a minimum of propulsion. They will have a large underwater profile and will ride comfortably although slowly. Trawlers and…

Read More

Trailering

The majority of recreational boats in the United States are trailered to and from the water. Your boat trailer is only one part of the entire boating package which includes the boat, trailer, hitch and towing vehicle. Neglecting the trailer’s maintenance can result in damage to your boat, your towing vehicle or both. The trailer…

Read More

Boat Capacity Plate

Chapter III – The BoatSection 7 – Boat Capacity Plate Boat Capacity Plate Boat builders must comply with Federal law by putting a Capacity Plate in sight of the helm (steering area) on motorized boats less than 20 feet in length. This plate displays three important items: the maximum weight of persons on board in…

Read More

Rules of the Road

There are two sets of navigation rules; inland and international. A nautical chart will show you the demarcation lines where the rules change from international to inland and vice versa. In general, these demarcation lines follow the coastline and cross inlets and bays. On the seaward side of the demarcation lines international rules apply. We…

Read More

Propulsion Requirements

Each vessel, depending on its design and intended use, will require different types of propulsion. Most recreational vessels in the United States today use outboard engines and are less than twenty feet in length. Outboard – Outboard motors are popular and quite useful on smaller boats. They are light and powerful and modern outboards are extremely…

Read More

How To Measure Length

A motor boat is measured along its centerline from the outside of the hull aft to the outside of the hull forward. This measurement does not include any attachments such as swim platforms, outboard motors, bow sprits, etc. This measurement is called the length overall (LOA). You may also hear the term length of waterline…

Read More

Engine Systems

Cooling – Boat motors are not equipped with radiators as cars are, but still must somehow dissipate the heat generated by the friction of the moving parts. The two most popular cooling systems are the raw water system and the enclosed or fresh water cooling system. The raw water system simply takes water from the body…

Read More

Meeting Situations

n the following situations, the give-way vessel must take action to keep well clear. The stand-on vessel should maintain its course and speed. If it becomes apparent that the actions taken (or not taken) by the give-way vessel are dangerous or insufficient, you should take action to avoid collision. Meeting Head-On When two power driven…

Read More

State Boating Regulations

State Boating Regulations State Boater Education Requirements You need to know the boating laws and regulations in the states where you boat. This link will direct you to your State’s own State specific information and quiz, if available. California Florida Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Maine Maryland Mississippi Nebraska Nevada North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Rhode_Island South_Carolina…

Read More

Vessel emergency repairs

Special Items Vessel emergency repairs Proper care and preventive maintenance on your boat will eliminate many emergency repairs. It is the nature of boats, however, to break down when you least want them to. Being innovative in your approach to repairs is essential. A few, well suited hand tools such as wrenches, screwdrivers, a hammer,…

Read More

Sailing

Propelling boats with sails has been going on for thousands of years. In the old days the sailors had very little control and most sailing was done downwind or with the wind pushing on the sails in order to move the boat. More recent technologies have made sailing, especially racing, much more controlled and allows…

Read More

Locks

Chapter IX – Special ItemsSection 2 – Locks Locks When traversing connected navigational areas with considerable difference in water levels you may encounter locks. These are used to move boats up or down from one level to another. Locks operate on a simple premise. You drive your boat into a chamber with gates at each…

Read More

Dams

Chapter IX – Special ItemsSection 3 – Dams Dams Dams are built to back up water in a reservoir for a variety of reasons. Dams are hazardous both above and below the dam. These wall-like structures pool the water as it flows over the crest and drops to the lower level. This drop creates a…

Read More

Awareness Of Environmental Conditions

Chapter V – PreparationSection 3 – Awareness Of Environmental Conditions Awareness Of Environmental Conditions Weather You should never leave the dock without first checking the local weather forecast. Checking the weather prior to leaving the dock is just as important in planning your trip as checking for fuel and required equipment. Special attention to weather…

Read More

Preparation

Chapter V – PreparationSection 1 – Vessel Check List Preparation Vessel Check List We have discussed in the previous section all of the required equipment for a safe outing. In addition to the minimum requirements, common sense tells us that we should check everything about our boat which could make the difference between an enjoyable…

Read More

Fueling

Chapter V – PreparationSection 6 – Fueling Fueling Proper fueling procedures are very important in preventing onboard fires. Gasoline vapors are heavier than air and can spread rapidly into enclosed spaces. You should check the bilges and all closed compartments for gasoline vapors. The sniff test is the most effective method for detecting fuel leaks….

Read More

Restricted Visibility

Chapter VI – OperationsSection 2c – Restricted Visibility Restricted Visibility When operating at night, or other times of restricted visibility, the required navigation lights as set forth in the required equipment section are mandatory to be displayed. The lights themselves will let each vessel know which is the stand-on or give-way vessel and each vessel…

Read More

Operations

Operator Responsibility It is the skipper’s responsibility to take charge of and to ensure the safety of his crew and his passengers. This means reviewing emergency equipment and procedures. Inform your crew and passengers of the rules of safe boating and try to insure that at least one other person aboard is capable of operating…

Read More

Navigation Rules

Navigation Rules The “Rules of the Road” or Collision Avoidance Regulations (COLREGS) were designed to give direction to vessels in order to set a standard that everyone could follow in order to prevent collisions of two or more vessels. They are many in number and cover almost every imaginable sequence of events which may lead…

Read More

Preventive Maintenance

Chapter V – PreparationSection 5 – Preventive Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Keeping your boat in good working order is just as much a part of the boating experience as the boating itself. Almost all elements of safety revolve around the fact that the boat has been maintained and all its parts and systems are able to…

Read More

Aids To Navigation

Chapter VI – OperationsSection 3 – Aids To Navigation Aids To Navigation In order to find our way safely from place to place on the water we must depend on road signs just as we do on land. The aids to navigation are the road signs of the water. Learning to understand them requires experience…

Read More

Ventilation

Chapter IV – Legal RequirementsSection 2d – Required Equipment Ventilation All vessels built after April 25, 1940 and which use gasoline for electrical generation, mechanical power or propulsion are required to be equipped with a ventilation system. The ventilation system may be either natural or powered: A natural ventilation system consists of at least two ventilator ducts,…

Read More

Sound Producing Devices

Chapter IV – Legal RequirementsSection 2e – Required Equipment Sound Producing Devices The navigation rules require sound signals to be made under certain circumstances. Meeting, crossing and overtaking situations described in the Navigation Rules section are examples of when sound signals are required. Recreational vessels are also required to sound signals during periods of reduced…

Read More

Required Equipment

Chapter IV – Legal RequirementsSection 2a – Required Equipment Required Equipment All boats are required to carry certain equipment. Most items must be approved by the U. S. Coast Guard and kept in good condition and used only for their designated purpose. The following table lists Federal minimums, check your state regulations for any additional…

Read More

Registration And Numbering

Chapter IV – Legal RequirementsSection 1 – Registration Legal Requirements Registration And Numbering All motorized vessels must be registered and, depending upon State requirements, titled when operating on state waters. If a vessel does not have a motor it may still have to be registered depending on the State. Each state registration and titling requirements…

Read More

Recommended Equipment

Chapter IV – Legal RequirementsSection 3 – Recommended Equipment Recommended Equipment In addition to all the equipment that the U. S. Coast Guard requires, certain equipment and supplies just make common sense to have. The following are items that should be carried aboard: VHF Radio Anchor and ground tackle Bilge Pump and or bailer Boat…

Read More