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About Chris

Early days of fishing and wakeboarding boats. These days a little more relaxing and sailing time, mostly on catamarans. Still too poor be a yacht man.

Articles by Chris

State Information for VA

Age Restrictions: PWC operators must be at least fourteen years old. PWC operators between the age of 14 and 16 must have proof of successful completion of an approved Boating Safety Course in order to operate a PWC. Successful completion of this Basic Boating Course meets Virginia’s boater education requirements. Registration/Titling: All boats propelled by machinery,…

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OPERATING LAWS AND REGULATIONS

VERMONT BOATING SAFETY OPERATING LAWS AND REGULATIONS Howard Dean, M.D., Governor A. James Walton, Jr., Commissioner COLLECTED MANAGEMENT RULES FOR VERMONT LAKES, PONDS AND RESERVOIRS(1) APPENDIX A NAME LOCATION (TOWN) SURFACE AREA IN ACRES > 30 CONTIGUOUS ACRES(2) (Y/N) INTERNAL COMBUSTION MOTORS ALLOWED(3) (Y/N) MAXIMUM SPEED LIMIT(4) M.P.H. PERSONAL WATERCRAFT ALLOWED (Y/N) USE BY AIRCRAFT…

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Nebraska Boating Regulations

Nebraska Boating Regulations This section contains information on Nebraska Boating Regulations that are in addition to the Federal Requirements covered in the Basic Boating Course . If you have not reviewed the course material, please do so now. All Federal Requirements in the basic boating course apply to Nebraska; this section lists Nebraska Boating Requirements…

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VERMONT BOATING SAFETY

OPERATING LAWS AND REGULATIONS OPERATION Can I Operate My Motorboat on Any Body of Water?  Restrictions apply on several other bodies of water around the state. Read carefully the Water Resources Board regulations for information on Lakes, Ponds and Reservoirs. When Should I Carry a Personal Flotation Device (P.F.D.)?  Anytime you use your boat. If your recreational…

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Vermont Boating Regulations

Vermont Boating Regulations This section contains information on Vermont Boating Regulations that arein addition to the Federal Requirements covered in the Basic Boating Course. Age Restrictions: Persons less than 16 years of age shall not operate a Personal Watercraft. Persons less than 12 years of age are restricted to motorboats of 6 hp or less. Anyone born after January…

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Bow

  The front of the boat is called the 

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Stern

The back of the boat is called the  

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Starboard

The right sideof the boat (looking forward) is called the side  

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Answers to Relative Bearings Practice Lesson

Coastal Navigation Course Chapter IX Answers to Relative Bearings Practice Lesson 1. Brenton Reef light bears 225° T. Your current course is 059° T. The relative bearing of Brenton Reef light is 166°. True Bearing – Ship’s Heading = Relative Bearing – 225 – 059 = 166 2. Cleveland Ledge Channel light bears 325° relative. Your course…

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U.S.C.G. License Exam Questions

From the U.S. Coast Guard Captains License Exam Database #40 Sailing Endorsement #39 Lifeboats #38 Obscure Rules of the Road #37 Stability #36 Rules of the Road – Inland & International #35 Radio Communications #34 Aids to Navigation #33Marlinespike #32 Block & Tackle #31 Tides #30 Compass Principles #29 Nautical Charts Average Score:71.3% #28 General…

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Operating in Fog

Rules of Thumb and other quick boating tips: Operating in Fog Hose Guards Kitty Litter Coat Hanger Tonnage Paint & Varnish Winterizing Knots Estimating Distance “Pencil” Radar Navigating by Eye Flares Piloting by Echo Mooring Tilt/Trim Wake Crossing Changing oil Aground Accident Reports The Original Rule of Thumb Back to BoatSafe.com Home Operating in Fog…

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National Weather Service

This place is really cool. You can get all kinds of weather information from one location. Once you click on the NWS Weather link you will be taken to the National Weather Service page that looks similar to the following representation. (We have also added an alternative weather link in case the NWS site is…

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Daily Tide and Current Predictions

How to Use Daily Tide and Current Predictions Here is great resource for boaters on the Internet. You can now check the tide schedule for just about any place in the country. Let’s say you are planning an afternoon cruise and a stop at a local restaurant on the Manatee Pocket (FL) just inside the…

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USCG Recall Database

The USCG Recall Database is not a searchable one, even though you may think so from the title. It may, however, be worth the effort to page through the table to see if you find anything unusual that could apply to a boat you’re about to purchase or one you already own. When you click…

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Local Notice to Mariners

The Local Notice to Mariners is a USCG publication which is issued by each district as shown in the map below. This publication lists changes in aides to navigation, chart changes, and other information that may be of interest to mariners. In order to keep your charts current, you should subscribe to the local notice…

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MAPFINDER REGION SELECTION

According to the The National Ocean Service : “The National Ocean Service’s (NOS) MapFinder is a one-stop World Wide Web service that provides direct Internet access to primary NOS imagery and data holdings for coastal photography, nautical charts, coastal survey maps, environmental sensitivity index maps, hydrographic surveys, water level stations, and geodetic control points. NOS…

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Interactive Marine Observations

The National Weather service, in cooperation with NOAA, has a site called Interactive Marine Observations . It provides marine weather information from many coastal areas of the US and other parts of the world. Marine weather information is gathered from several sources including offshore weather buoys, coastal weather reporting stations, and reports from commercial shipping…

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Search MIC Database

  You may remember reading in a past tip that the first three letters of the Hull Identification Number are a three letter code that identifies the manufacturer. To decipher the code and determine the manufacturer of a boat, click on the link “USCG Manuf. ID Code (MIC)” and you will find a page similar…

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Navigation Basics

Nautical Know How – Coastal Navigation Course Navigation Basics This information supplements the Nautical Know How Coastal Navigation Textbook. How to use parallel rulers   How to use dividers   Register for the Navigation Course

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How to use dividers

Navigation Tools How to use dividers Using dividers and the latitude scale on your nautical chart, you are able to measure distance in nautical miles. (Remember, do not use longitudes to measure distance. Longitude lines converge at the poles and the distance between them changes relative to your position on the earth.) One minute equals…

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How to use parallel rulers

How to use parallel rulers Parallel rulers are used to plot direction on your nautical chart. They are, essentially, two straight-edges hinged so that they maintain the same angle. By alternating the moving edge, and securely holding down the non-moving edge, you can move the rulers about the chart while still maintaining the same angle….

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Conversion for meters, feet and fathoms

Conversion for meters, feet and fathoms – BoatSafe.com Given Meters, Compute Feet and Fathoms Meters: Results: Feet: Fathoms: Given Feet, Compute Meters and Fathoms: Feet: Meters: Fathoms: Given Fathoms, Compute the Meters and Feet: Fathoms: Meters: Feet:

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CONVERSIONÂ FOR NAUTICAL AND STATUTE MILES

Convert Nautical Miles to Statute Miles: Nautical Miles: Statute Miles: Convert Statute Miles to Nautical Miles: Statute Miles: Nautical Miles:

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Speed, Time, Distance Calculations

Time Conversion Enter Time (24 hour=2230) Hr Min Enter End Time: Enter Start Time: Converting to Decimal: Elapsed Time: Speed, Time and Distance Given Two Values, Compute the Third: Speed in knots: Elapsed time (decimal): Distance in nautical miles:

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CHART SCALES

Given the Scale, Compute Nautical Miles, Statute Miles and Feet Scale: 1: Results: Nautical Miles Per Inch: Statute Miles Per Inch: Inches Per Nautical Mile: Inches Per Statute Mile: Feet Per Inch:

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Distance to the Horizon

Given the Height of Eye, Compute the Distance to the Horizon Height of eye (specify units): (Decimal) feet meters Distance to the Horizon: (Nautical Miles) (Statute Miles)

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Marlinespike – Round Turn & Two Half Hitches

Used to permanently tie to a piling, mooring or ring. Take a full turn around the object being tied to and take two half hitches around the line itself.

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Marlinespike – Terminology

Bitter end: the free end of a line Standing part: the longer part of a line which is fixed during the tying of a knot Bight: The part of the rope between the end and the standing part. A loop formed by folding the rope back on itself Turn: a loop formed around a post,…

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Marlinespike – Types of Rope Construction

Types of Rope Construction Rope is constructed in two basic ways, laid and braided, although there are variations on the theme. The first is “3 strand” line. The direction of twist is called the lay of the rope. Three strand twisted line can be “laid” right or left, and should always be coiled with the…

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Marlinespike – Line Handling and Stowing

Neatness counts, especially because itÂ’s also safer. DonÂ’t throw lines in heaps about the boat. TheyÂ’ll kink, tangle or jam when you need them and you and your passengers are likely to trip over them. Get into the habit of coiling your lines when they are not in use, and flemishing any lose ends on…

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