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marlinespike

Marlinespike – Hitches – Anchorbend (aka Fisherman’s Bend)

For securing a line to an anchor or buoy.   Pass the working end of the line through a ring from front to back to form a round turn. Bring the working end down and behind the standing part. Bring it over the standing part and through the round turn to form a half-hitch around…

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Marlinespike – Round Turn & Two Half Hitches

Used to permanently tie to a piling, mooring or ring. Take a full turn around the object being tied to and take two half hitches around the line itself.

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Marlinespike – Terminology

Bitter end: the free end of a line Standing part: the longer part of a line which is fixed during the tying of a knot Bight: The part of the rope between the end and the standing part. A loop formed by folding the rope back on itself Turn: a loop formed around a post,…

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Marlinespike – Types of Rope Construction

Types of Rope Construction Rope is constructed in two basic ways, laid and braided, although there are variations on the theme. The first is “3 strand” line. The direction of twist is called the lay of the rope. Three strand twisted line can be “laid” right or left, and should always be coiled with the…

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Marlinespike – Line Handling and Stowing

Neatness counts, especially because itÂ’s also safer. DonÂ’t throw lines in heaps about the boat. TheyÂ’ll kink, tangle or jam when you need them and you and your passengers are likely to trip over them. Get into the habit of coiling your lines when they are not in use, and flemishing any lose ends on…

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Marlinespike – Hitches – Cleat Hitch

Take the line to the ear of the cleat furthest from where the line comes from (the load). Take one wrap around the base of the cleat and then start a figure eight across the top of the opposite ear. Finish with a half hitch turned under so that the line is coming away from…

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Marlinespike – Rope Breaking Strength

Each type of line, natural fiber, synthetic and wire rope, have different breaking strengths and safe working loads. Natural breaking strength of manila line is the standard against which other lines are compared. Synthetic lines have been assigned “comparison factors” against which they are compared to manila line. The basic breaking strength factor for manila…

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Marlinespike – Hitches – Clove Hitch

Used to temporarily tie to a piling, this knot can come loose. You may add a couple of half hitches to make it more permanent. This knot is simply two loops with an end tucked under.     If you can reach the top of the piling, an alternative way to tie a clove hitch…

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Marlinespike – Knots to Know

As mentioned earlier, if you are planning to take the USCG license exam you will not be expected to actually tie knots, however, you will find several questions concerning the names of knots and their intended use. Following is a graphic that you may see when taking the exam and you will be asked to…

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Marlinespike – Rope Materials

There are many materials used today to make rope; synthetic fiber, natural fiber and wire. The most popular is nylon, a synthetic. It is strong, holds up well to the weather and stress, and coils without kinking. Line is also made from natural fibers like cotton and hemp (manila), and other synthetic fibers such as…

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